Saturday , April 29 2017
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Using a Mobile Fuel Tank to Speed up the Harvest

For a farmer, there’s nothing like staring out at a field full of pumpkins, corn, or cabbage on harvest day.

 

There’s nothing like it because while it could be a potential moneymaker (to hopefully bring you back into the black), it can also be a frantic time where efficiency is the key to raking in that profit.

 

Unfortunately, the bigger the field, the longer it takes to make the rounds on your farm equipment: dropping off loads, returning to the barn to fix busted belts and cogs and even to refuel each machine one at a time.

 

While you probably can’t do anything about those belts or cogs, you can save yourself hours by streamlining your refueling process. And it’s easier than you think.

 

Mobile Refueling

 

Instead of relying on in-ground farm fuel tanks—which require you to return each machine one by one across acres of land—take the tank to where you’re working that day.

 

Mobile fuel tanks allow you to bring your fuel source into the most remote places of your land, saving you hours and dollars. Best of all, you can drag the trailer behind your pickup or any other vehicle with a standard hitch on the back.

 

Heavy-duty fuel tanks

 

Since you’ll be beating up your tank more than a construction fuel trailer, you need the most rugged design available. A steel reinforced tank, heavy-duty tires, a solid axle and great payload capacity are the main aspects you should look for when deciding on fuel trailers.

 

Also look for road-ready trailers so you can get around your property even faster.

 

Goodbye problems, hello profits

 

When you add up the amount of time you’ll save by refueling at the spot you’re harvesting, it’s easy to see why mobile fuel trailers are a cost-effective solution.

 

You will save:

 

  • Man-hours spent traveling between harvesting and the refueling station
  • Wasted fuel between harvest location and fuel station
  • Real hours of in-transit time

These things translate into a real cost savings for your operation. Plus, with all the time you save, you’ll reap a greater harvest, sell a greater amount of goods, and incur a greater profit—all because you saved a few hours a day.

 

And think about it this way: an hour a day for 365 days—that’s 365 hours you can work your land, refurbish your machines or open a farm store where you can sell your produce directly to local food hounds for a direct profit.

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